Posts Tagged ‘scripting langauge’

Picking the first language to learn for novice programmers can be a daunting task. For many, they simply have no clear where to start, and don’t know any of the merits and drawbacks of the various choices they have. Even among experienced programmers, the debate on what new programmers should start with is long and has many different sides. In this article I will give my side.

My Perspective

Before I talk about which language people should start trying to learn first, I will discuss where I am coming from when I make that choice. The first language someone learns in my opinion should be fairly easy to develop with, and be able to give the programmer results fairly quickly. The main problem I generally see with fledgling programmers just starting out is that they get very frustrated with error messages, and in general struggle to connect the concepts they are working with to an actual useful program. I keep these things in mind when making my choice.

 

My Opinion

For new programmers, I highly recommend starting with a web development related language, namely Javascript or PHP, PHP being the first recommendation. The reason I say this is simple. PHP is a very easy language to program in. As a scripting language,  development goes much faster (no having to recompile upon changing a single line of code), and the language itself is much more forgiving. A new user doesn’t have to memorize many different syntactical rules, so all they have to focus on is understanding the concepts, and getting practice with solving problems. Also, PHP (and to an extent, Javascript) comes right out of the box with many various helper functions and algorithms that in other languages you need to either import a library, or write the function yourself. This allows novice programmers to solve problems much faster and easier. However, this comes with a drawback. A programmer who gets used to PHP having a lot of functionality built in that other languages don’t have by default may make it difficult for the programmer to migrate to different languages/platforms. On the other hand, while the programmer may become too reliant on these built in functions, they do know to some extent how to solve a similar problem with another language. The new problem becomes finding out how the other language implements the functionality used in the built in PHP function, or how to write it themselves.

The second reason I suggest PHP (or Javascript), and web development in general is because it makes using the various concepts they’ve learned in practice more rewarding. It is much easier to make an interactive GUI with PHP combined with HTML/CSS than with a programming language like C++, Java, or even Python. Because of this, its much easier to make a “cool” application even with only basic skills. Making a website where you can log in and see a welcome screen is extremely easy with PHP and HTML, but would be much more difficult for a novice in, say, C++ or Java.

 

Drawbacks

While learning PHP (or web development in general) first is not a bad idea, there are some drawbacks. One thing, which I mentioned earlier in this post, was that many novice users who use PHP may become dependent on the built in functions that aren’t available in other languages without either importing a library, or writing the code yourself. This can make transitioning to a more difficult language even harder. This type of problem isn’t unique to PHP either, but common to people who start with most scripting languages, and than transition to a more difficult, stricter language. For example, in my school, the introductory programming class used Python, while the next class (Object Oriented Programming) is taught using C++. Many of the students who go from the first class to the second struggle early in the class with the unavailability of certain functionality that they got so used to using in Python.

Another issue is bad habits that are easy to form with scripting languages. Since most scripting languages have no explicit typing, the concept of a variable with a type can be difficult to understand, especially if you have been programming for a good amount of time.

In general, since scripting languages or usually much easier than stricter programming languages, novice programmers are able to progress faster and without much frustration, but they can pick up bad habits, like the expectation of the language to provide certain functionality, or the expectation of the program to handle many things in the background that you have to set up yourself in stricter languages. The example that one may come to think of first is garbage collection, which is available in most scripting languages, and even some strict programming languages (most notable being Java), but not in, say, C++. Scripting languages also hide many of the core functionality that is inherent in the language from the user. This can create programmers who know how to do something a certain way, but have no idea of the concept behind what allows them to accomplish whatever goal they have. This makes it much harder for these programmers to solve more complex problems that require knowledge of how programs and the underlying code actually works. For example, a novice may figure out how to stop a certain PHP notice from occurring by using the notice suppression operator (the @ operator), but may have no clue why that operator actually fixes (well it doesn’t actually fix the error, but rather stops it from being reported) the error.

However, these problems can be resolved by going from learning an easy scripting language to learning a more difficult, stricter programming language like C++ (in fact, I highly recommend starting with PHP/Javascript and even MySQL if you are adventurous, and then learning C++ in depth). This way, the programmer gets the benefits of learning a very strict language like C++, where you essentially have full control over your program and therefore have to know not only how to solve problems, but why certain code and concepts solve the problem. Also, the programmer won’t be nearly as frustrated since they already have a language under their belt. The learning curve of C++ is high enough, but some of that difficulty can be mitigated if you already have practice with most or all of the basic programming concepts.

 

In short, for anyone who wishes to learn how to program and make applications, I suggest starting with web design, namely PHP (but Javascript, ASP, or any other web based language would work) because development is faster and easier for a novice programmer, and seeing the results of your knowledge and making cool, useful applications is much easier, especially if you want to incorporate some sort of GUI elements.

As a side note, since not everyone is interested in web design, or has the means to purchase a server (although you can always download software like LAMP, or WAMP to turn your computer into a local web server), other scripting languages will work as well. If you are going to go this route, I suggest Python personally.

 

If you have any questions or comments, or disagree with what I say, leave a comment below! I would love to have a discussion with someone who has a differing opinion from mine.